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NEW SOCIETY BLOG — Sustainability

A Slowly Warming Sun

In A Brief History of the Earth's Climate: Everyone's Guide to the Science of Climate Change, Steven Earle provides an accessible answer to why human-caused global warming and climate change is different from the natural evolution of the Earth's climate. Today, we share an excerpt of his book on how the first theories of a habitable planet became possible.

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What Does ‘Climate Hypocrite’ Even Mean?

Self-confessed eco-hypocrite Sami Grover says we should do what we can in our own lives, but then we need to target those actions to create systemic change. Today, we share an excerpt from We’re All Climate Hypocrites Now: How Embracing Our Limitations Can Unlock the Power of a Movement on what Sami means when he uses the term hypocrite.

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Understanding Power

For much of Richard Heinberg’s adult life, he’s been bothered by the questions of is it possible that we humans, or at least some of us, now enjoy too much of a good thing? Or is our problem merely that we don’t understand power very well and, therefore, misuse it? Today, he explores these questions and provides context for how we can better understand power.

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Introduction to Power by Richard Heinberg

Richard Heinberg’s latest title, Power is an exploration of humanity's power over nature and the power of some people over others. Power traces how four key elements developed to give humans extraordinary power: tool making ability, language, social complexity, and the ability to harness energy sources — most significantly, fossil fuels. Today, we take an excerpt from Power that explains how Richard started on the journey of writing this book.

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Individual Climate Action Does Make a Difference

How do we adapt our lives to reduce our carbon footprint? In Living the 1.5 Degree Lifestyle, Lloyd Alter reveals the carbon costs of everything we do and provides practical tips for making significant reductions and not sweating the small stuff. Today on the blog, we take an excerpt from Living the 1.5 Degree Lifestyle, where Lloyd explains how various forms of food waste impact our carbon footprint.

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The Footprint of Food Waste

How do we adapt our lives to reduce our carbon footprint? In Living the 1.5 Degree Lifestyle, Lloyd Alter reveals the carbon costs of everything we do and provides practical tips for making significant reductions and not sweating the small stuff. Today on the blog, we take an excerpt from Living the 1.5 Degree Lifestyle, where Lloyd explains how various forms of food waste impact our carbon footprint.

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Why You Should Consider Harvesting Rainwater for a Drought

Many places across North America are experiencing significant drought. For those who are not connected to city water, paying attention to water levels is critical. As efforts to conserve water ramp up, the foreword written by Peter J. Coombes from Essential Rainwater Harvesting reminds us of the importance of harvesting rainwater.

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How to Make Your Landscape More Drought Tolerant

The East Vancouver Island Basin has been in a Level 4 drought since early July. The question of how to conserve water and protect the water tables, especially on the Gulf Islands is on many minds. Today, we take an excerpt from Climate-Wise Landscaping: Practical Actions for a Sustainable Future by Susan Reed and Ginny Stibolt on making landscapes more drought-tolerant.

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Pawpaw Myths

Have you eaten pawpaw before? Often referred to as Indiana bananas or hipster bananas, they were nearly a forgotten fruit, native to North America. However, they are making a massive comeback with foodies, chefs, craft brewers, and discerning fruit-lovers. Today, we take an excerpt from Pawpaws: The Complete Growing and Marketing Guide, where Blake Cothron explains dispels five common myths about Pawpaws.

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